We have previously torn down several Amazon Echo devices, including the 3rd gen Dot, 3rd gen Dot with Clock, the Flex, the Echo Input, and the Echo Dot 4th Generation. In this teardown, we will look at the new Echo Dot 5th generation model, a smart speaker with the Amazon Alexa service.

The 5th generation Echo Dot is a new model announced in September 2022; the new design has the same round appearance and buttons on the side of the curved section as the previous version 4 device.

New with the 5th Generation includes an Improved audio experience for clearer vocals, deeper bass, vibrant sound, a built-in temperature sensor, and eero wireless technology, which is Amazon's whole-home WiFi coverage system using a mesh network.

Amazon Echo Dot 5th generation vs Echo Dot 4th Generation

  • Dot 5 and Dot 4 are the same physical size at 100 x 100 x 89mm.
  • Dot 5 no longer has the audio port on the device's rear.
  • Dot 5 has a new larger speaker measuring 1.73 inches compared to 1.6 inches on the Dot 4 model.
  • Dot 5 has a new temperature sensor.

In the Box

  • The Echo Dot
  • 240V UK power supply
  • Setup instructions
  • Echo Dot terms of use
Amazon Echo Dot 5 Box
Amazon Echo Dot 5 Box
The Amazon Echo Dot 5 and power supply
The Amazon Echo Dot 5, power supply and instruction manuals

Top of the Echo Dot

The top of the smart speaker has four buttons. The + and – buttons control the volume; the circle button activates Alexa, and the circle with a line through it enables or disables the microphones.

Amazon Echo Dot 5 Top
Amazon Echo Dot 5 Buttons

Case Base

The base has the serial number, product logos, and certification marks.

On the rear, a power input socket. The previous version had a headphone/audio out 3.5mm stereo socket, but it has been removed for the 5th generation model.

Base of the Echo Dot with the power and headphone sockets on the back of the case
The base of the Echo Dot with the power socket on the back of the case
The rubber foot removed showing the USB debug header
The rubber foot was removed, showing the 9-pin USB debug header

Opening the Case

The cover is held in place using adhesive tape and locator pins.

To open the case, first, you need to remove the non-slip rubber cover on the base of the echo dot using a thin knife or some other flat-bladed tool.

Under the cover, you will find four T5 Torx bolts and a recessed nine-pin header which appears to be a debug or programming port.

Removing the four T5 Torx bolts allows you to separate the two halves of the case.

Lower half of the case with LED diffuser ring
The lower half of the case with an LED diffuser ring
Top half of the case with the main PCB, with RGB LEDS around the edge.
The top half of the case with the main PCB, with RGB LEDs around the edge.

Metal Chassis with Processor PCB

Inside you will find a circuit board mounted to a cast metal housing with a small ribbon cable leading to the switch PCB.

The PCB is removed using four Torx bolts and the removal of a small flat-flex cable. 

With the PCB removed, the four silver Torx screws can be removed, allowing the metal housing to be removed from the top cover. This reveals the switch PCB and speaker.

PCB removed showing speaker connection pads and ribbon cable to the switch PCB
PCB removed, showing speaker connection pads and ribbon cable to the switch PCB
The metal housing removed from the top dome revealing the speaker
The metal housing was removed from the top dome revealing the speaker
Speaker removed from the metal housing
Speaker removed from the metal housing

The upper side of the Processor PCB

Revision 5 of the Echo Dot uses an AZ2 processor, an updated version of the Amazon Neural Edge processor. The new processor is marked as MT8519BAAV, but I have not found any public information about this processor. Storage is provided with a Micron NW942 Nand flash IC. RAM is provided with an SK Hynix H54926AY 0.5GB model with a speed of 4266Mbps located under a metal shield.

Below the CPU and Ram is a MediaTek WiFi / Bluetooth Controller, part number MT7653BSN which outputs two PCB antennas, one on each side of the board. This is now mounted on a smaller daughterboard PCB compared to the direct central PCB mounting on previous versions.

Above the metal shield is the power socket.

A single flat flex connector links the processor PCB with the top switching and microphone PCB.

Top of the main PCB showing WiFi / Bluetooth IC at the bottom and shielding over the CPU and RAM
Top of the main PCB showing WiFi / Bluetooth IC at the bottom and shielding over the CPU and RAM
Top of the PCB with the metal shielding removed showing the main processor and ram
The top of the PCB with the metal shielding removed shows the main processor and ram.
CPU and RAM under the metal shield
MT8519BAAV - MediaTek Processor, RAM, and Storage
WiFi and Bluetooth chip
MT7653BSN - MediaTek WiFi / Bluetooth Controller

The lower side of the Processor PCB

On the lower side of the main PCB are 12 RGB LEDs around the edge which a W4970 3246 RGB LED driver drives.

The internal speaker is driven by a Maxim integrated MAX98396EWB Digital Input Class-DG Amplifier.

There is a chip marked MT6398BN, which is an unknown MediaTek part but based on the surrounding components, it appears to be a switching power supply.

There is a small metal enclosure soldered into the PCB; we did not want to risk damaging the board by removing this.

Bottom of the main PCB showing the metal shielding can over the memory chip
The bottom of the main PCB shows the metal shielding
Ribbon cable
Ribbon cable going to the button and microphone PCB

Upper Switch PCB

The small round PCB, which is screwed into the top of the case, contains four buttons, two LEDs, and a light sensor on the upper side with a soft rubber gasket.

This is fixed into the upper case with four small bolts and strong glue.

The Switch and Microphone PCB in the top of the case
The Switch and Microphone PCB at the top of the case
Switch PCB and speaker grill.
Switch PCB with speaker grill below

On the reverse of the circuit board are three microphones and a TLV320ADC5140 Texas Instruments Quad-channel 768-kHz Burr-Brown™ audio analogue to digital converter.   There are several other smaller ICs on the board, but we could not find any information on what they are.

The Echo dot uses the three microphones to locate the direction the voice is coming from and filter out background noise. There is a space for a fourth microphone like on previous versions, but the pads were unpopulated on our device.

Top of the Switch PCB showing the four control switches and holes for the microphones
Top of the Switch PCB showing the four switches and microphone holes
Back of the Switch PCB showing four microphones and a single ADC chip
The back of the Switch PCB shows four microphones and a single ADC chip

All internal parts

All the internal parts that make up the echo dot.

Teardown Complete
Amazon Echo Dot Revision 5 Teardown Complete

Power Consumption

We measured the power consumption of the Amazon Echo Dot 5 with a Hopi mains power meter.

Device Status Power in Watts
Booting the device 1.8W
Idle waiting for input 1.3W
Responding to a user command 1.5W
Medium volume with music playing 2.4W
Maximum volume with music playing 3.9W