Record Vise No 1 and No 2 Restoration

Published on Wednesday 23 September 2020
Categories: General | Projects |

Before and after

Earlier this year I purchased a pair of Record bench engineers vises from a local house who resells gardening and other equipment and donate the proceeds to charity. I paid £20 for both.

The vises are Record No 1 and No 2 models and are engineers vises designed to be mounted onto a workbench or other strong surface.

For over 40 years we have had a No 1 Record vise in our shed / workshop and it has been well used and abused over the years and the clamping handle is very bent and twisted from using extension bars to increase the clamping force. The plan with the newer vises is to restore them and use the larger No 2 vise to replace our old No 1 model.

Record vises were made by The Record Tools Factory, Sheffield in the UK and they manufactured vises between 1909 to 2000. The business was then taken over by Irwin Tools.

Both vises were very dirty and rusty where they had been kept outside for some time and on the threaded parts and undersides was years of grease and grime.

The first step to restore both vises was to take them apart and clean all the components.

The larger Record No 2 vise was missing the spring and washer which opens the jaw when unscrewed on the clamping screw and the roll-pin which was supposed to hold the spring and washer in place was sheared off in the shaft and needed to be drilled out. A new spring, washer and pin would be needed for the reassembly.

The smaller Record No 1 vise had the spring and washer in place but the retaining pin was rusted in place and buckled, I initially cut this flat using the CNC Mill and used a drift to remove it fully.

Cleaning the rust and grease

Rusty Made in England
Rusty Made in England
No 1 and No 2 with lots of rust
No 1 and No 2 with lots of rust
No 2 Vise rust
No 2 Vise rust
Trying to remove the spring retaining pin
Trying to remove the spring retaining pin
Lots of rust to remove
Lots of rust to remove
After degreasing the parts
After degreasing the parts

Once both vises had been disassembled, the parts were soaked overnight in degreaser and any remaining grease and grime was removed using an old paint brush. The degreaser was washed away using hot soapy water and then the parts left in the sun for several hours to dry.

The screws holding the jaws on the larger vise could not be removed and I did not want to risk causing more damage by drilling them screws out, so I decided to leave the jaws in place when removing the rust.

I did not have any chemical paint stripper to remove the original blue paint and with the lockdown due to Covid 19 none of the local shops were open so we removed as much paint as possible and sanded all the surfaces to allow the primer to be applied.

The rust was removed from all the parts using a mixture of power tools with rotary wire brushes, hand wire brushes, sandpaper and wire wool.

Priming and Painting

Cleaned and masking tape added
Cleaned and masking tape added
Cleaned and masking tape added
Cleaned and masking tape added
After spraying with Red Oxide primer
After spraying with Red Oxide primer
After spraying with Red Oxide primer
After spraying with Red Oxide primer
Record Blue Paint from Paragon
Record Blue Paint from Paragon
Second coat of Record Blue Paint
Second coat of Record Blue Paint

Before the vises could be primed and painted any remaining dust and dirt had to be removed using isopropyl alcohol and clean rags. The areas which did not need to be painted were covered in masking tape and then sprayed using Red Oxide primer and left for two days to fully dry.

I found a business called Paragon Enamel Paints who sell a very wide range of paints in modern and vintage colours. They sell a blue paint which is the same as the original Record vise paint called “BS381C 110 Roundel Blue - Record Vice Blue” https://www.paragonpaints.co.uk/BS381C-110-Roundel-Blue-Record-Vice-Blue.html

The two coats of enamel paint were applied using a small brush as we do not have access to spaying equipment and left to dry for 24 hours between each layer. It was left for several days to fully harden before assembly. Using a spray system would have given a smoother overall finish but as they are being used in our workshop the brushed finish was good enough.

Final Assembly

The No 1 vise was reassembled and a new roll pin installed to hold the opening spring. We initially tried using a split pin but had clearance issues when turning the vise handle.

Grease was added to the threaded sections and mating surfaces.

As we need a new spring and washer for the larger No 2 vise, we shortened an old air rifle spring to fit and found a suitable washer from our nuts, bolts and washers’ buckets which needed to be modified on the lathe. The rest of the assembly was the same as the No 1 vise.

Ready to assemble
Ready to assemble
Test fitting with a split pin
Test fitting with a split pin
No 1 Vise finished
No 1 Vise finished
Fresh Paint on Made in England Logo
Fresh Paint on Made in England Logo
The finished Vises
The finished Vises
The finished Vises
The finished Vises

With both vises now finished and the larger No 2 model installed in our shed/workshop they should both outlive me and be passed onto future generations to use.

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9 Comments


Chris

16 December 2020 at 8:43 pm

Nice restoration ??

jim gray

02 April 2021 at 2:09 pm

Do you know where I can get a spring for a Vintage Record No.2 Engineering Bench Vice?

Brian

02 April 2021 at 2:53 pm

Jim, I used an old air rifle spring which was cut using an angle grinder to replace the missing spring on my vise

Jason

11 April 2021 at 9:29 pm

I’ve just started restoring a No 2 which I inherited from a previous generation. It was passed onto me over 10 years and had become quite rusty. I’ve started with a citric acid bath, using the solution left over from my main project, the restoration of my childhood BMX. The results with citric acid are quite amazing so I just decided to drop the vice in for a couple of days to see what happened. I now need to work out how to remove the string retaining pin and remove the last of the rust. Your post is great inspiration about the results that are possible. Thanks, J

Alex

12 April 2021 at 12:04 pm

Nice job! Did you use Matt or Gloss paint? How much of that 500ml can was left after you'd done both vises?

Brian

12 April 2021 at 12:15 pm

Alex, I used gloss paint, I think i only use a 1/5 of the 500mm can after giving them both two coats of paint.

James

12 April 2021 at 4:15 pm

Hi, I recently picked up a number 2 to restore, its missing the half nut and I was wonder if you know anywhere to get spares like that. thanks

Peter

13 May 2021 at 6:48 pm

Hi
I have an old record no 3 vice which occasionally jumps open if you know what I mean , under load. I have dismantled it and found the back of the cast nut Looks broken . There is no hole for the retaining pin which just seems to act as a back stop. Would this cause this effect . The screw and nut seem not too worn .

Dave

20 July 2021 at 11:13 pm

I have a record 21 vice were can I get it refurbished thanks dave I'm in Kent area


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Brian Dorey

Welcome to my blog, here you will find my projects and other things.
I make websites and manufacturer and sell expansion boards for the Raspberry Pi range of computers.

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